“Long live the new flesh.”

Review: Wishful Thinking

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Wishful Thinking Poster

Wishful Thinking is a new short film directed by Aurélia Marine. It follows the character of Catherine, on her journey of love, lust, obsession and despair. Less than 20 minutes long, the film has a lot of classic hallmarks you would expect to see from an ‘arty’ short, but is there more here than there seems?

As I say, there are a lot of art-house cinema conventions in Wishful Thinking, (the black and white, the lack of dialogue, unconventional editing etc.), which depending on your personal views could extract a sigh of ‘not again’. However, even those of you who strongly opposed to this type of film will be intrigued by certain elements of Wishful Thinking.

Behind the clichéd close ups and jump cuts, there is a story – or rather story arc- that intrigued me to the point of fascination. The themes that the film explores (love, lust, identity and obsession) have been fundamental in films throughout the history of cinema, but here they are conveyed with almost venom-like potency. It’s as though the filmmakers have taken all the challenging emotional dilemmas and quandaries you’d find in a feature length film and have squeezed them into a concentrated, pint-sized dose of stimulating cinema.

The acting is fairly decent and adds to the challenging ideals of the film. If the aim of art cinema is to stimulate the audience mentally as well as visually, then Wishful thinking certainly ticks both of those boxes, and will leave you with ideas and questions that will stay with you long after the viewing. In summary, Wishful Thinking is a well-crafted, thought-provoking piece that all those involved should be proud of, but thinking that it is going to set the festival scene alight may just be a little too wishful.