"I find your lack of faith disturbing.”

Quentin Tarantino is rewriting The Hateful Eight

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Last night saw the stage reading of Quentin Tarantino‘s The Hateful Eight. It featured Samuel L Jackson, Kurt Russell, Tim Roth, Amber Tamblyn, Bruce Dern, Zoe Bell, Walton Goggins, James Parks, Michael Madsen and James Remar.

It looks like we may get to see the script turned into a film as Tarantino said he is rewriting the script.“I am working right now on a second draft. This is the first draft.” He said Chapter 5 (“Black Night, White Hell”) would be removed or rewritten altogether. It sounds like this would change the story considerably as it did feature many deaths.

It was three hours long and THR had a run down of the story.

A Western set somewhere between eight and 12 years after the Civil War, which begins with Russell as a bounty hunter chained to his prey, Tamblyn, inside a stage coach as they travel toward a destination where he will collect a $10,000 reward for her.
The stagecoach is stopped by an African-American Civil War veteran (Jackson), who mysteriously appears with a saddle but no horse; they are then joined by another mystery man who claims to be going into town as its new sheriff, before all eventually take refuge from a blizzard in a “haberdashery” where almost all of the remaining story unfolds — that is, four of the five chapters take place almost entirely within one room.
What follows is a combination of Western and Agatha Christie-style whodunnit, as various men and women engage in conversation and shootings in the haberdashery — not least Dern, who plays a Civil War general whose son appears to have been killed by Jackson.
In one of the many moments when the audience roared its approval, Jackson explains in exquisite and excruciating detail how he forced the general’s son to perform oral sex on him before killing him.
Much of the later part of the story hinges on a coffee pot that has been filled with poison by one of the people in the room, and by Jackson’s attempt to discover who did it. Along the way, Tarantino uses flashbacks, and then more flashbacks, to reveal backstory — along with scenes in equal parts comic and violent.

It would have been an amazing evening and I wish I could have been there.

Fingers crossed we will be getting to see a film version of The Hateful Eight at some point in the future.

Thanks to Pete for the link.