Blu-ray Review: Ghost Story

Blu-ray Review: Ghost Story

Having not heard about Ghost Story before now – a traditionally told horror film starring Fred Astaire – the idea of sitting down with this 1981  tale of revenge, deceit, lies and, ultimately, ghosts, seemed appealing. And, for the majority of its few hour duration, Ghost Story is an effective and nicely told chiller. However, the opening...

Blu-ray Review: The Killing Complete Series (seasons 1-4)

Looking for a sizeable Christmas gift that’ll keep a loved one occupied for hours one end but also reduce them to a quivering mess of emotional devastation? Well look no further than the complete series (that’s seasons 1-4) of the excellent The Killing that’s made its way to a Blu-ray boxset. Starring Joel Kinnaman and Mireille Enos as...

Review: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2

Review: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2

Seamlessly picking up after the shocking conclusion of Mockingjay – Part 1, we’re thrown into a chaotic and hugely intense world that’s seeking to uprise against the tyrannical leadership of one President Snow (Donald Sutherland). Unrest, oppression, and violent backlash lace this politically-driven franchise finale, whereby Jennifer...

London Film Festival 2015 Review: Room

London Film Festival 2015 Review: Room

Assuming you know absolutely nothing at the start of Room, a deceptive opening tricks us into thinking Brie Larson’s Ma (that’s all we ever know her as) and her 5-year-old son Jack (Jacob Tremblay) are living a little too cosily in poorly furnished, cramped conditions. We see the long-haired child timidly greet the inanimate objects...

London Film Festival 2015 Review: Brooklyn

London Film Festival 2015 Review: Brooklyn

’50s Brooklyn is the setting for John Crowley’s sweet-natured adaptation of Colm Tóibín’s novel that exudes unquestionable warmth and tenderness, based on a young Irish migrant by the name of Eilis (played by the talented Saoirse Ronan.) Beginning in her quaint Irish hometown, Eilis moves to Brooklyn to seek bigger opportunities and...

Review: Kill Your Friends

Review: Kill Your Friends

Nicholas Hoult stars in this British-based tale of debauchery set in the Britpop culture of the ’90s, and it’ll immediately remind you of a couple of famous films of similar ilk, but very polarising in quality. From the moment it starts, Owen Harris’s Kill Your Friends feels like it desperately wants to be a modern companion piece...

London Film Festival 2015 Review: Listen to Me Marlon

London Film Festival 2015 Review: Listen to Me Marlon

We’ve often seen retrospective features revolving around 20th Century icons, such as Marilyn Monroe (most recently in the ficitonalised telling of her life in My Weekend with Marilyn), but this exploration of the very intimate side of Marlon Brando’s is something quite different. It’s different in the sense that we’re privileged to...

31 Days of Horror: The Descent – Review

31 Days of Horror: The Descent – Review

To celebrate Halloween, Live for Films is sharing a horror movie review each night in the 31 Days of Horror. You can be involved by sending in your review of a horror film – new, old, good, bad, depressing, funny, disgusting, psychological. As long as it can be classed as a horror then you can send it here phil@liveforfilms.com. Over the past 20 years...

Review: SPECTRE

Review: SPECTRE

It’s best to enter SPECTRE; the Sam Mendes-directed and 24th 007 movie, with as little expectation as possible. The year-long hype machine has, for all intents and purposes, done it no good; instead working to detrimental effect as we eagerly awaited another superlative effort like Skyfall. Yet any expectation remotely connected to the $1.1 billion grosser...

2015 London Film Festival Review: When Marnie Was There – “One of Studio Ghibli’s finest”

2015 London Film Festival Review: When Marnie Was There – “One of Studio Ghibli’s finest”

Conflicting emotions will no doubt engulf any fan of Studio Ghibli when presented with the opportunity to see When Marnie Was There. On one hand, a new feature from the acclaimed film studio will send admirers into a salivating frenzy, but also fill them with sadness and uncertainty over whether this is indeed their last film. Anna’s a young girl...